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Theories of developmental psychology

Author: Patricia H Miller
Publisher: New York : Worth Publishers, Macmillian Learning, [2016]
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Sixth editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
Miller presents the main theories of developmental psychology available today. Each chapter includes a section on applications to help students connect theoretical constructs to clinical practice, education, and child rearing.
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Patricia H Miller
ISBN: 1429278986 9781429278980
OCLC Number: 971222495
Description: xiii, 490 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: 10. Reflections --
Developmental issues revisited: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops A need for better theoretical accounts of mechanisms of development --
Historical progress of developmental theories. 9. Contemporary minitheories and emerging approaches --
The Theory theory --
Modularity nativism --
Dynamic-systems theory --
Critical psychology: are theories of development gendered? --
Position on developmental issues. 8. Gibson's ecological theory of perceptual development --
Biographical sketch --
General orientation to the theory: Ecological approach: affordances --
Information is specified in stimulation --
Humans as active perceivers --
Methodology --
Developmental trends: Increasing specificity and economy in the perception of affordances --
Optimization of attention --
What infants learn about: Communication --
Interaction with objects --
Locomotion in the spatial layout --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Contemporary research. 7. Ethology and other evolutionary theories --
History of the theory --
General orientation to the theory: Species-specific innate behavior --
Evolutionary perspective --
Learning predispositions --
Methodology --
Contributions to human developmental psychology --
Infant-caretaker attachment --
Peer interaction --
Problem solving --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Contemporary research. 6. Information-processing theory --
History of the theory --
General orientation to the theory: Humans as information-processing systems --
Development as self-modification --
Task analysis --
Methodology --
Major developmental approaches --
Memory --
Metamemory --
Strategies: acquisition, variability, and choice --
Rules for problem solving --
Production and connectionist simulations of problem solving and learning --
Intelligence --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Contemporary research. 5. Social learning theory --
History of the theory --
Learning theory --
Social learning theory --
General orientation to the theory: Observational learning --
Causal model includes environment-person-behavior system --
Cognitive contributions to learning --
Self-efficacy and agency --
Examples of developmental research: moral judgments and gender roles --
Moral judgments and behavior --
Gender-role development --
Mechanism of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Contemporary research. 3. Freud's and Erikson's psychoanalytic theories --
Freud: biographical sketch --
General orientation to the theory: Dynamic approach --
Structural approach --
Topographic approach --
Normal-abnormal continuum --
Methodology --
Description of stages: Oral stage (roughly birth to 1 year) --
Anal stage (roughly 1 to 3 years) --
Phallic stage (roughly 3 to 5 years) --
Period latency (roughly 5 years to the beginning of puberty) --
Genital stage (adolescence) --
Case study of "Little Hans" --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Contemporary research. 4. Vygotsky and the sociocultural approach: biographical sketch --
General orientation to the theory: Child-in-activity-in-cultural-context as the unit of study --
Zone of proximal development --
The sociocultural origins of individual mental functioning: the intermental constructs the intramental --
Tools provided by a culture mediate intellectual functioning --
Methodology --
Examples of Vygotskian-sociocultural research --
Private speech and inner speech --
Development of concepts --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
A related approach: developing-person-in-context --
Contemporary research: Collaborative problem solving --
Research across cultures --
Development through narratives and conversations --
Concluding comments about contemporary Vygotskian-sociocultural research.4. Vygotsky and the sociocultural approach: biographical sketch --
General orientation to the theory: Child-in-activity-in-cultural-context as the unit of study --
Zone of proximal development --
The sociocultural origins of individual mental functioning: the intermental constructs the intramental --
Tools provided by a culture mediate intellectual functioning --
Methodology --
Examples of Vygotskian-sociocultural research --
Private speech and inner speech --
Development of concepts --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues: Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
A related approach: developing-person-in-context --
Contemporary research: Collaborative problem solving --
Research across cultures --
Development through narratives and conversations --
Concluding comments about contemporary Vygotskian-sociocultural research. Erikson: biographical sketch --
General orientation to the theory: Psychosocial stages --
Emphasis on identity --
Expansion of psychoanalytic methodology --
Description of the stages: Stage I: Basic trust versus basic mistrust (roughly birth to 1 year) --
Stage 2: Autonomy versus shame and doubt (roughly 2 to 3 years) --
Stage 3: Initiative versus guilt (roughly 4 to 5 years) --
Stage 4: Industry versus inferiority (roughly 6 years to puberty) --
Stage 5: Identity and repudiation versus identity diffusion (adolescence) --
Stage 6: Intimacy and solidarity versus isolation (young adulthood) --
Stage 7: Generativity versus stagnation and self-absorption (middle adulthood) --
Stage 8: Integrity versus despair (late adulthood) --
Mechanisms of development --
Position on developmental issues --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Contemporary research. 2. Piaget's cognitive-state theory and the neo-Piagetians --
General orientation to the theory: Genetic epistemology --
Biological approach --
Structuralism --
Stage approach --
Methodology --
Description of the stages: Sensorimotor period (roughly birth to 2 years) --
Preoperational period (roughly 2 to 7 years) --
Concrete operational period (roughly 7 to 11 years) --
Formal operational period (roughly 11 to 15 years) --
Memory --
Mechanisms of development --
Cognitive organization --
Cognitive adaptation --
Cognitive equilibration --
Position on developmental issues --
Human nature --
Qualitative versus quantitative development --
Nature versus nurture --
What develops --
Applications --
Evaluation of the theory: Strengths --
Weaknesses --
Piaget's own modifications of his theory --
The Neo-Piagetians --
Robbie Case --
Kurt Fischer --
Neo-Piagetian themes --
Contemporary research --
Infants' advanced competencies --
Domain-specific concepts --
Mechanism of development --
Developmental cognitive neuroscience. 1. Introduction --
What is a theory? --
What is a developmental theory? --
Of what value is a developmental theory? --
Main issues: What is the basic nature of humans? --
Is developmental qualitative or quantitative? --
How do nature and nurture contribute to development? --
What is it that develops?
Responsibility: Patricia H. Miller.

Abstract:

Patricia Miller's acclaimed text offers an ideal way to help students understand and distinguish the major theoretical schools of child development. This fully updated new edition includes a new  Read more...
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